Acura (1999-2000) SRS Airbag Module DTC Crash Codes

Acura SRS Airbag Module DTC Crash Codes
Reset your Acura srs airbag module for just $49.

Was your Acura in an accident? Or maybe you purchased it salvage? No matter the reason, if your Acura was in a crash, then the airbag light will be on. To turn it off, you have to either replace your SRS airbag module, or, the better option that saves you lots of money – reset the airbag module with us for just $49!

If you have an Acura from the years 1999 to 2000, then the Acura DTC crash codes stored on your airbag module will most likely be one of the following:

  • 1-1 & 1-2 open circuited Or high Resistance In Drivers Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 1-3 short circuited To a Wire In Driver’s Inflatable Air Bag Module Or low Resistance
  • 1-4 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS. Driver’s Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 1-5 short circuited To Ground. Drivers Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 2-1 & 2-2 open circuited In Passenger’s Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 2-3 short circuited To a Wire In Passenger’s Inflatable Air Bag Module Or low Resistance
  • 2-4 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS, Passenger’s Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 2-5 short circuited To Ground, Passenger’s Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 3-1 & 3-2 open circuited Or high Resistance In Driver’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 3-3 short circuited To a Wire Or low Resistance In Driver’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 3-4 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS In Driver’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 3-5 short circuited To Ground In Driver’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 4-1 & 4-2 open circuited Or high Resistance In Front Passenger’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 4-3 short circuited To a Wire Or low Resistance In Front Passenger’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 4-4 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS In Passenger’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 4-5 short circuited To Ground In Passenger’s Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
    5-1, 5-2, 5-4, 5-5, 5-8, 6-1, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4, 6-5, 6-6, 6-7, 6-8, 7- 1, 7-2, 7-3, 8-1, 8-2, 8-5, 8- 6, 8-7 & 8-8 Internal Failure Of SRS or Supplemental 
  • Restraint System Unit. Check Battery System Voltage, If Voltage Is Low , repair 12 volt power or VSS feed circuit Prior To Troubleshooting SRS or Supplemental Restraint System 
  • 9-1 Intermittent SRS or Supplemental Restraint System Failures
  • 9-2 SRS or Supplemental Restraint System Unit Internal Failure
  • 9-3 Faulty Driver’s Seat Belt Buckle Switch
  • 9-4 Faulty Passenger’s Seat Belt Buckle Switch
  • 10-1 Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device) Deployed
  • 10-2 Driver’s Side Air Bag Deployed
  • 10-3 Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device) & Driver’s Side Air Bag Deployed
  • 10-4 Front Passenger’s Side Air Bag Deployed
  • 10-5 Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device) & Front Passenger’s Side Air Bag Deployed
  • 10-6 Driver’s & Front Passenger’s Air Bags Deployed
  • 10-7 Seat Belt Pretensioner (Explosive Device) & Driver’s & Front Passenger’s Side Air Bags Deployed
  • 11-1 & 11-2 open circuited Or high Resistance In Driver’s Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 11-3 short circuited To a Wire Or low Resistance In Driver’s Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 11-4 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS In Driver’s Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 11-5 short circuited To Ground In Driver’s Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 12-1 & 12-2 open circuited Or high Resistance In Front Passengers Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 12-3 short circuited To a Wire Or low Resistance In Front Passenger’s Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 12-4 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS In Front Passenger’s Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 12-5 short circuited To Ground In Front Passenger’s Side Inflatable Air Bag Module
  • 13-1 & 13-2 Faulty Driver’s Side Module Or SRS or Supplemental Restraint System Unit
  • 13-3 No Signal From Driver’s Side Impact Sensor
  • 13-4 Faulty 12 volt power or VSS supply or 12 volt power or VSS feed To Driver’s Side Impact Sensor
  • 13-5 Faulty Safing Sensor For Driver’s Side Impact Sensor
  • 14-1 Faulty Passenger’s Side Impact Sensor Or SRS or Supplemental Restraint System Unit
  • 14-2 Faulty Passenger’s Side Impact Sensor Or SRS or Supplemental Restraint System Unit
  • 14-3 Faulty SRS or Supplemental Restraint System Floor Harness Or Front Passenger’s Side Impact Sensor
  • 14-4 Faulty 12 volt power or VSS supply or 12 volt power or VSS feed To Front Passenger’s Side Impact Sensor
  • 14-5 Faulty Safing Sensor For Front Passenger’s Side Impact Sensor
  • 15-1 Faulty OPDS Unit
  • 15-2 Faulty Side Impact Air Bag Indicator light Circuit
  • 15-3 Faulty OPDS Sensor
  • 21-1 open circuited Or high Resistance In Driver’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 21-3 short circuited To a Wire Or low Resistance In Driver’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 21-4 short circuited To Ground In Driver’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 21-5 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS In Driver’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 22-1 open circuited Or high Resistance In Passenger’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 22-3 short circuited To a Wire Or low Resistance In Passenger’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 22-4 short circuited To Ground In Passenger’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)
  • 22-5 short circuited To 12 volt power or VSS In Passenger’s Seat Belt Buckle Pretensioner (Explosive Device)

SRS Airbag Module Deployed

Finding out that your SRS airbag module deployed is one of the many things that can happen to your car after you’ve been involved in an  accident. It is your responsibility to maintain a safe vehicle at all cost and time, and especially so after an accident! Below are a few tips you should follow for the safety of your vehicle and your own safety after an accident. 

First off, you should check yourself as well as your passengers (if you have any) for any injuries. It would also be considerate to check on the status of the driver and passengers of the other vehicle(s) that have been involved in the crash. 

Next, if you have reason to believe that your car has sustained extensive damage, the best bet would be to have it towed to an auto body shop rather than drive it yourself. 

There are a few major causes of concern concerning your car after being involved in an accident. A simple checklist your should follow to figure out whether your car is still drivable is checking to ensure that your lamps are functioning, making sure your mirrors are intact, ensuring there is no leaking fluid, being sure your wheels are in proper alignment, and checking to see that your hood is not broken. 

If the SRS airbag module deployed, that is another crucial thing to get looked at after an accident. The SRS airbag module computer stored in a car controls the entire airbag system, so evidently it plays a huge role in your vehicle! Everything from the airbags and seat belts to the impact sensors go through it. Even if you have been involved in a minor accident, the airbag module could light up your airbag light and store crash data. At times, seat belts may deploy and create additional codes. Safety Restore provides an affordable solution to this giant problem. They erase all crash data and hard codes and reprogram your SRS module to factory condition. Their work requires no additional programming! Especially when you have to already pay for the repair of other damages after an accident, saving money wherever you can definitely helps! The company offers their work at an affordable price and much more reasonable than going to a dealer to get the work done. What is even more great is that the company provides a lifetime warranty on their airbag module resets. Safety Restore employs experienced engineers who use 100% OEM parts, so you receive the quality work you deserve to restore your safety after an accident.